Menu
1-877-483-4583
  • South Carolina Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (73) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (73) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (38) Services for Young Adults
  • (16) Expectant Mothers
  • (31) Women
  • (42) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (35) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (46) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (24) Spanish Speaking
  • (10) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (23) Dual Diagnosis
  • (31) Alcohol Detox
  • (19) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (12) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (18) Men
  • (5) Over 50
  • (11) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (7) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (4) Residential Beds for Adolescents
  • (3) Lesbian and Gay
  • (2) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (4) Transitional Living Services
  • (2) Mental Balance Treatment Services
  • (1) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (1) Health Services
1-877-483-4583

The state of South Carolina is battling the serious problem of alcohol addiction and alcoholism. Alcohol addiction destroys everything in its path, destroying lives daily in the communities of South Carolina. The need for alcohol rehab and alcohol treatment in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol treatment and alcohol rehabilitation in South Carolina can rescue individuals who are struggling with alcohol addiction and alcoholism, and give them hope for the future. Alcohol Rehab offers individuals a real solution to addiction, one that can be lasting. Caring specialists will help individuals through the recovery process and with peer support individuals can overcome alcohol addiction. To prevent future relapse, individuals will receive important life tools so that they can change behaviors and learn how to make the right choices. Effective alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in South Carolina gives individuals the power to take their lives back and begin making positive choices.

Alcoholics in South Carolina who have battled their addiction for some time will most often experience physical withdrawal when they suddenly quit drinking alcohol. Withdrawal is nothing to fool around with, and can be an extremely tough and painful process to endure. In rare cases withdrawal can cause death. It is extremely important that individuals in South Carolina who want to beat their alcohol addiction seek the help they need through this process. An alcohol rehab can successfully get them through withdrawal and onto their next steps of treatment.

Alcohol Rehabs in South Carolina vary depending on what the individual is looking for. Alcohol treatment and rehabilitation options in South Carolina include Long-term Alcohol Rehab Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabilitation, Short-term Alcohol Treatment Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

The destructive cycle of alcohol addiction and alcoholism can end today. Seek alcohol treatment and rehabilitation in South Carolina, before it is too late.


South Carolina alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In South Carolina, after peaking in 1986, at 636 and reaching their lowest level in 1994, at 269, the actual number of alcohol-related deaths increased to pre-1986 levels. The percentage of traffic fatalities that were alcohol related has also increased in recent years after dropping to its lowest level of 32% in 1994. For the most recent year reported, out of all traffic fatalities, 44% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 55% in 1983.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the South Carolina, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the South Carolina drunk driving statistics, as shown above, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value." The fatality rates shown above refer to the number of people killed in all traffic accidents and, separately, in alcohol related traffic accidents, per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT).

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

730

441

60

402

55

1983

844

509

60

463

55

1984

916

503

55

452

49

1985

951

534

56

480

50

1986

1,059

636

60

560

53

1987

1,086

577

53

495

46

1988

1,031

523

51

456

44

1989

996

473

47

403

40

1990

979

494

50

421

43

1991

890

420

47

379

43

1992

807

352

44

307

38

1993

846

305

36

273

32

1994

847

269

32

243

29

1995

881

346

39

300

34

1996

930

428

46

374

40

1997

903

362

40

330

37

1998

1,002

372

37

334

33

1999

1,065

391

37

357

34

2000

1,065

480

45

424

40

2001

1,060

582

55

513

48

2002

1,053

549

52

485

46

2003

968

488

50

423

44

2004

1,046

464

44

413

39

2005

1,093

464

42

396

36

2006

1,037

477

46

420

40

2007

1,066

520

49

463

43

2008

920

463

50

403

44



2003-2004 South Carolina Alcohol Related Issue:

Percentage %

Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

8.26%

[19th of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

13.5%

[35th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

47.5%

[40th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

5.6%

[14th of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

464

[11th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

1.09 per 10,000 people

[6th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

44%

[10th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

43.74%

[42nd of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in South Carolina?

  • Non-commercial drivers age 21+ are considered legally drunk in South Carolina when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater. In South Carolina, school bus drivers are commercial drivers.
  • Drivers under 21 in South Carolina are legally drunk when their blood alcohol concentration is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in South Carolina

  • A first-time offender in South Carolina is subject to a $400 fine or imprisonment for 48 hours to 30 days. In lieu of the 48-hour minimum prison term, the sentencing judge may order 48 hours of public service work. The driver's license suspension period is six months.
  • For a second violation in South Carolina within 10 years, the offender faces five days to one year in prison and will be fined $2,100 to $5,100. In lieu of prison, the sentencing judge may order no less than 30 days of public service work. The driver's license suspension period is one year.
  • For a third violation in South Carolina within 10 years, the offender faces 60 days to three years in prison and will be fined $3,800 and $6,300. The driver's license suspension period is two years. If, however, the third conviction occurred within five years from the date of the first offense, the suspension period is four years.
  • A person who commits a fourth or subsequent DUI in South Carolina faces one to five years in prison. The offender's driver's license will be revoked for life. The offender may apply for reinstatement after seven years.

Enhanced Penalty for DUI that Causes Great Bodily Injury or Death

A person who commits a DUI in South Carolina that causes great bodily injury will be imprisoned for 30 days to 15 years and fined $5,100 to $10,100. "Great bodily injury" means bodily injury that creates a substantial risk of death or which causes serous, permanent disfigurement or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member or organ. A person who commits a DUI that causes the death of another will be imprisoned from one to 25 years and fined $10,100 to $25,100.

Enhanced Penalty for DUI with Passenger Under 16 in the Vehicle

A person 18 or over who commits a DUI in South Carolina while a passenger under 16 is in the vehicle is subject to additional penalties of up to one-half of the maximum prison sentence and one-half of the maximum fine applicable to the initial offense. For example, the maximum prison term for a second-time DUI offender is one year and the maximum fine is $5,100. If the offender committed the DUI while a passenger under 16 was in the vehicle, he or she is subject to an additional six months in prison and an additional $2,550 fine.

Ignition Interlock

When a person commits a DUI, the sentencing judge may require the offender to use an ignition interlock device for a specific length of time that the judge finds appropriate.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under South Carolina's DUI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for at least one year. If, however, the driver was operating a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is at least three years. A commercial driver who commits a second DUI in South Carolina while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

In addition to other penalties that may apply under South Carolina's DUI laws, a driver under 21 whose BAC registered .02 or more will have his or her driver's license suspended for three months for a first violation or six months if the driver had been previously convicted of DUI within five years. Within 30 days of receiving the suspension notice, the driver must either request an administrative hearing or enroll in an alcohol safety action program.

What is South Carolina's Dram Shop Act?

Under this law, an injured third party has a right to maintain a negligence action against a tavern owner if the tavern served alcohol to an intoxicated adult or to a person under 21 and the drinker's intoxication caused the injury. South Carolina does not permit a dram shop action to be brought by an intoxicated adult drinker who suffers injury because of his or her own intoxication.

Criminal Liability of Licensed Drinking Establishments for Serving Alcohol to Minors

A server at a tavern in South Carolina who knowingly sells alcohol to a person under 21 faces 30 to 60 days in prison and a fine of $100 to $200.

Criminal Liability for Furnishing Alcohol to Minors

A person who furnishes or gives alcohol to a person under 21 in South Carolina faces up to 30 days in prison or a fine of up to $200.

  • Contact Us
  • A three week study by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse that had men and women consume 30-40 grams of alcohol (approximately three beers) per day, showed a 6.8% reduction in testosterone for the men and none for the women at the end of the study-period.
  • Chronic heavy drinkers will often have dilated veins in the esophagus, signs of liver disease, and brain damage; another common symptom of constant excessive drinking is a loss of cognitive function.
  • Restaurants and bars often will serve oversize or over-poured drinks, unless the drink comes pre-packaged (as in a bottle of beer); with wine, bars tend to give more standard sizes.
  • Experts in the field of substance abuse recommend that an alcoholic have professional supervision if they are to undergo alcohol detox; when an alcohol suddenly withdraws from alcohol, they may experience delirium tremens, which could potentially be deadly.